Pulling transmission codes


When a trouble code sets, the computer will begin flashing the O/D off light in the dash. To retrieve codes, locate the diagnostic connector, which sits under the dash, left of the steering column, within six inches of the ECAT control unit figure 3.




Then follow these easy steps:
  • Connect the positive probe of an analog voltmeter to the black/yellow wire.

  • Connect the negative lead to the blue/black wire.

  • Turn on the key, engine off.


  • When you turn on the ignition, the needle will begin to pulse. Long pulses represent the number five and short pulses represent the ones digits. The sum of these digits will become the primary portion of the code.
  • Move your voltmeter's negative lead to the blue/white wire.


  • If the needle is pulsing, add 10 to the primary portion of the code. If the needle doesn't pulse, don't add anything to the code figure 4.




    In 1993, all 626s, MX6s and Probes began using the GF4A-EL, which is the 7-solenoid version of the G4AEL. To retrieve codes from the 2.5L V6 models:
  • Ground the TAT pin in the diagnostic connector, located by the driver's side shock tower figure 5

  • Turn on the key, engine off.




  • The hold light will flash the trouble codes. The 2.0L 4-cylinder models used the engine computer to control the transaxle. To retrieve transaxle and engine codes, ground the TEN pin in the diagnostic connector. When you turn on the ignition, the Check Engine light will flash the codes.

    This seems fairly simple, and it is ... until you get one of those 2.5L vehicles that, for whatever reason, is missing the TAT pin in the diagnostic connector. In those vehicles, the only way to retrieve codes is by grounding the TAT circuit at the computer connector figure 6. The computer is located under the dash, in front of the center console.




    In 1994, the 2.0L 626 started using the CD4E transaxle with a Ford EEC-IV computer, which controls both the engine and transaxle. The best way to retrieve codes and live data is to use a scan tool with domestic software.

    The only catch is that even though they use the same computer as the Ford Probe, the VIN is different. To solve this, make the scan tool think the vehicle is a Probe. When the scan tool asks for the fifth digit of the VIN, input the letter "T." When the scan tool asks for the eighth digit, input the letter "A." When the scan tool asks for the tenth digit, input the tenth digit of the 626 you're working on. The scan tool will function just as it would if it were monitoring a Ford Probe.

    GEARS Magazine Nov 2000